Jackson College Students

Title

Jackson College Students

Subject

African Americans--Civil rights
Race relations
Black universities and colleges
Racism--United States
African American--History
Civil rights demonstrations
African American leadership
Black Muslims
African Americans--Social conditions
Race, class, and social structure
Education
African Americans--Race identity
Nonviolence
Passive resistance
Protest movements
Multiculturalism

Description

A group of college students from Jackson College discuss the civil rights movement at the time of the interview and their own participation in it. They discuss whether the general population of segregated places in the Southern states actually endorses segregation, and how the resistance to the civil rights movement is merely the actions of a very vocal minority. They also have discussions on Abraham Lincoln's views on race, W.E.B. Dubois' "great split" theory, the nonviolent approach to protest, and the difficulty of balancing activism and the life of a college student.

Format

audio

Identifier

2008oh610_rpwcr039

Interviewer

Robert Penn Warren

Interviewee

Jackson College Students

OHMS Object Text

5.1 2008oh610_rpwcr039 Interview with Jackson College Students, February 12, 1964 2008oh610_rpwcr039 01:02:34 ohrpwcr Robert Penn Warren Civil Rights Oral History Collection rpwcr001 Robert Penn Warren Civil Rights Oral History Project Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries (Exhibit) African Americans--Civil rights Race relations Black universities and colleges Racism--United States African American--History Civil rights demonstrations African American leadership Black Muslims African Americans--Social conditions Race, class, and social structure Education African Americans--Race identity Nonviolence Passive resistance Protest movements Multiculturalism Yellow journalism Ku Klux Klan Lincoln Memorial March on Washington, 1963 Abraham Lincoln Emancipation Proclamation National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Jackson State University Martin Luther King, Jr. Sit-ins Black bourgeoisie W.E.B. Dubois Jackson College Students Robert Penn Warren 2008oh610_rpwcr039_students_acc001.mp3 0 https://oralhistory.uky.edu/spokedbaudio/2008oh610_rpwcr039_students_acc001.mp3 Other audio 5 The will of the majority 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3. The group discusses the issue of whether the general population of segregated places in the Southern states actually endorses segregation, and how the resistance to the civil rights movement is merely the actions of a very vocal minority. [This segment includes a brief testing of the microphone as well as a brief period of silence.] &quot ; Yellow journalism&quot ; ; Atlanta Constitution ; Consent ; Convictions ; Intimidation ; James Baldwin ; Ku Klux Klan (KKK) ; Majority ; Memphis Press-Scimitar ; Mississippi ; Paul B. Johnson, Jr. ; Physical appearances ; Pressure ; Silence ; Silent majority ; Southern mobs ; Speeches ; Trial African Americans--Social conditions. ; Black universities and colleges ; Journalism ; Newspapers ; Race discrimination. ; Racism--United States ; Religion ; United States--Race relations. 17 685 The complex history of Abraham Lincoln Speaking of history, or--do you see any irony in the fact that, uh, the March on Washington was--came to the shadow of the Lincoln Monument. Warren presents the group with historical details that suggest Lincoln was not as sympathetic to African Americans as many believe, and thus highlights the irony of holding a rally on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. The group discusses this issue, as well as other evidence of support they've seen from white citizens. Abraham Lincoln ; Basic rights ; Editorials ; Emancipation Proclamation ; Emmett Till ; Equality ; Greenville (Miss.) ; Humanitarian ; Jackson Daily News ; Lincoln Memorial ; March on Washington, 1963 ; Nation ; Purpose ; Speeches ; Ulysses S. Grant ; Union African American--History ; African Americans--Social conditions. ; Civil rights demonstrations ; Historians ; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 --Views on race relations ; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865--Views on slavery ; National monuments ; Race discrimination. ; Segregation. ; United States--Race relations. 17 1204 Optimism in building positive race relations There's, uh, something I ran into on a question I'd like to raise in a moment. The group contrasts African Americans who sympathize with the Black Muslim movement, who they regard as more pessimistic, with those who support the mainstream civil rights movement. Though they see the latter as more optimistic, they recognize the inherent difficulties and risks facing them. Attitudes ; Demoralization ; History ; Inferior ; Integrity ; James Baldwin ; Lawyers ; Media ; Niagara Movement ; Optimistic ; Picket lines ; Students ; The South ; World War II African American leadership ; African Americans--Conduct of life ; African Americans--Social conditions ; Black Muslims ; Change. ; Civil rights demonstrations ; Civil rights movements--United States ; Civil rights workers ; Race relations--History ; World War, 1939-1945 17 1755 Balancing activism and school Is it true that students in this college can't, uh, participate in the local, uh, various organizations that are involved in civil rights? The group shares experiences with participating in the movement while enrolled as college students. They relate this issue to their earlier conversation regarding the lawyer who sympathized with the Black Muslim movement. African American college students ; Class attendance ; Faculty meetings ; Individual ; Jackson State University ; Lawyers ; Ministers ; National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) African Americans--Education. ; African Americans--Social conditions. ; African Americans--Societies, etc. ; Change. ; Civil rights movements--United States ; Civil rights workers ; College administrators ; Education ; Integration ; Student movements ; Universities and colleges 17 2040 Connecting with other members of the movement Where shall we start, Dr. Clark, this time? The group discusses the notion that college-educated or college-enrolled participants in the civil rights movement can have trouble communicating and connecting with fellow participants from other backgrounds. A. Philip Randolph ; Acceptance ; African American college students ; American society ; Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ; Equality ; Incomes ; Jail ; James Farmer ; James Forman ; Leadership ; Principles African Americans--Social conditions. ; Black universities and colleges ; Civil rights demonstrations ; Civil rights movements--United States ; Civil rights workers ; Education ; Integration ; Race, class, and social structure ; Religion 17 2403 The zero-sum conundrum Let's take this example. The group responds to the idea that any social gains made by the black community would result in losses from the white community, an idea that accounts for much of the resistance to the civil rights movement. They also discuss how African Americans can improve themselves so that they appear deserving of equal treatment. Acceptance ; Black bourgeoisie ; Efforts ; High schools ; Income ; Jungle ; Majority ; Opinions ; Principles ; Respect ; Students ; War ; Workers African Americans--Civil rights ; African Americans--Social conditions. ; Civil rights movements--United States ; Education ; Education--United States--Societies, etc. ; Integration ; United States--Race relations. 17 2703 Embracing a nonviolent approach Let me change the subject a little bit and throw another question out. The group comments on criticisms laid against Dr. King's philosophy of peaceful, nonviolent protest and respect for the oppressors. Black nationalists ; Dr. Kenneth Clark ; Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ; Emotions ; Forgiveness ; Heritage ; Injustice ; Ministers ; Nonviolence ; Oppression ; Psychological burdens ; Psychologists ; Purpose ; Quotations ; Revenge ; Stability African American leadership ; African Americans--Race identity ; Civil rights movements--United States ; Nonviolence ; Passive resistance ; Protest movements ; Religion ; Social sciences 17 3165 Du Bois' split culture concept You raise a question there that's fundamentally interesting, I think. The group comments on W.E.B. Du Bois' idea that black people are simultaneously drawn to emphasizing their race as a valuable difference from the rest of American society, and subsuming themselves into a more nondescript, general American culture. African heritage ; African traditions ; American cultural traditions ; Anglo-Saxons ; Barbarians ; Conditions ; Declaration of Independence ; England ; Equality ; Ethnic groups ; Extreme ; Heritage ; Human race ; Identification ; Individuals ; Magna Carta ; Nonviolent ; Psyche ; Rights ; Rogue ; W.E.B. Dubois African Americans--Conduct of life ; African Americans--Race identity ; African Americans--Social conditions. ; Black Muslims ; Christianity. ; Culture. ; Multiculturalism 17 interview A group of college students from Jackson College discuss the civil rights movement at the time of the interview and their own participation in it. They discuss whether the general population of segregated places in the Southern states actually endorses segregation, and how the resistance to the civil rights movement is merely the actions of a very vocal minority. They also have discussions on Abraham Lincoln's views on race, W.E.B. Dubois' &quot ; great split&quot ; theory, the nonviolent approach to protest, and the difficulty of balancing activism and the life of a college student. No transcript. All rights to the interviews, including but not restricted to legal title, copyrights and literary property rights, have been transferred to the University of Kentucky Libraries. audio Interviews may be reproduced with permission from Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, Special Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries. 0 http://www.nunncenter.net/ohms/render.php?cachefile=2008oh610_rpwcr039_students_ohm.xml 2008oh610_rpwcr039_students_ohm.xml https://oralhistory.uky.edu/catalog/xt7pvm42vb4w

Interview Keyword

Yellow journalism
Ku Klux Klan
Lincoln Memorial
March on Washington, 1963
Abraham Lincoln
Emancipation Proclamation
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
Jackson State University
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Sit-ins
Black bourgeoisie
W.E.B. Dubois

Sort Priority

0011

Interview Usage

Interviews may be reproduced with permission from Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, Special Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries.

Files

jacksoncollege_sm.jpg


Citation

“Jackson College Students,” The Robert Penn Warren Oral History Archive, accessed December 6, 2019, https://www.nunncenter.net/robertpennwarren/items/show/123.