Tougaloo Students

Title

Tougaloo Students

Subject

African Americans--Civil rights
Race relations
Black universities and colleges
African American leadership
African Americans--Social conditions
African Americans--Societies, etc.
United States--Race relations
African Americans--Conduct of life
African Americans--Southern states
Segregation
Police misconduct
Civil rights demonstrations
Social movements
Racism
Civil rights movements--United States
Civil rights workers

Description

Tougaloo College was and is a Black private liberal arts college in Tougaloo, Mississippi (near Jackson), founded in 1869. A small group of people, approximately four to six, one of whom is female, speak; they are not identified in the recording of their interview. Warren discusses with the students the recent trial of Byron de la Beckwith for the murder of civil rights worker Medgar Evers. The trial resulted in a hung jury, with five voting to convict and seven opposed. They discuss whether the trial could have been rigged, and agree that even Mississippi's bothering to rig a mistrial would be a sign that things are changing--i.e., that the power structure knew national attention might make a simple acquittal disastrous. A female speaker expresses the opinion that if Beckwith is convicted in a later trial, he will not get the death penalty and will be pardoned after a short stay in prison. This speaker's skepticism about the motives of any white Mississippians leads Warren to probe the students on whether there can be an honest white Southerner and whether the African American's stereotype of himself has changed. (Note: Beckwith's second trial also ended in a mistrial, but he was convicted of Evers' murder in a third trial thirty years later, in 1994.)

Format

audio

Identifier

2003oh042_rpwcr031

Interviewer

Robert Penn Warren

Interviewee

Tougaloo Students

OHMS Object Text

5.1 2003oh042_rpwcr031 Interview with Tougaloo Students, 1964 2003oh042_rpwcr031 00:55:46 ohrpwcr Robert Penn Warren Civil Rights Oral History Collection rpwcr001 Robert Penn Warren Civil Rights Oral History Project Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries (Exhibit) African Americans--Civil rights Race relations Black universities and colleges African American leadership African Americans--Social conditions African Americans--Societies, etc. United States--Race relations African Americans--Conduct of life African Americans--Southern states Segregation Police misconduct Civil rights demonstrations Social movements Racism Civil rights movements--United States Civil rights workers Accommodationism Mohandas Gandhi Sit-ins W.E.B. Dubois Integration Race identity Africa Southern mobs Jackson (Miss.) Nonviolence Protest movements Human rights Passive resistance Elections Tougaloo Students Robert Penn Warren 2003oh042_rpwcr031_tougaloo_acc001.mp3 0 https://oralhistory.uky.edu/spokedbaudio/2003oh042_rpwcr031_tougaloo_acc001.mp3 Other audio 0 Expectations of African American leaders You wanna say something just as you are? The members of the group introduce themselves and then speak generally about the qualities they like to see in leaders of the Black freedom/civil rights movement. Topics include charisma, peaceful protest, and relations to similar social justice and human rights causes around the world. Characteristics ; Charisma ; Human rights ; Peaceful protests ; Qualities ; Social justice African American leadership ; African Americans--Social conditions ; African Americans--Societies, etc. ; Charisma ; Human rights ; Nonviolence ; Protest movements 17 374 Critiques of nonviolent strategy Let me read you a, a quotation from Dr. Kenneth Clark. The group answers the charge that nonviolent protest is somehow pathological or self-defeating. They address the implausibility of fully armed resistance by the black community, and they share their experiences from nonviolent protests to attest to that method's benefits. Accommodationism ; Dr. Kenneth Clark ; Guns ; Mahatma Gandhi ; Mohandas Gandhi ; Pathology ; Sit-ins ; Trauma African American leadership ; African Americans--Social conditions. ; Black Muslims ; Civil rights demonstrations ; Civil rights movements--United States ; Nonviolence ; Passive resistance ; Protest movements. ; United States--Race relations 17 1258 Du Bois' split culture concept Let me change the subject. The group speaks on the notion raised by W.E.B. Du Bois on the dilemma facing African Americans of whether to win the right to practice their own culture apart from the rest of America, or to slowly integrate to a general American bourgeois culture dominated by whites. Africa ; Bourgeoisie ; Dilemmas ; Integration ; Race identity ; W. E. B. Du Bois African Americans--Conduct of life ; African Americans--Race identity. ; African Americans--Segregation ; African Americans--Social conditions. ; African Americans--Social life and customs ; Human rights ; United States--Race relations 17 1757 The makeup of the Southern mob Let's try this one. The group comments on the observation made by James Baldwin that the majority of white Southerners have no objection to integration or any sincere preference for segregation. Citizens Council ; Integration ; Jackson (Miss.) ; James Baldwin ; Ross Barnett ; Southern mobs African Americans--Segregation ; African Americans--Social conditions. ; African Americans--Southern states ; Elections ; Elections--United States--Demographic aspects ; Police misconduct ; United States--Race relations. 17 2392 The changing face of racism Did any of you see any irony, any, well, uh, morbid comedy in the fact that the Freedom March on Washington wound up at Lincoln Memorial? The group discusses some of the historical irony behind holding civil rights marches at the Lincoln Memorial, or praising other historical figures whose views on race may not have been as progressive as many people believe. They discuss racism as a whole and how its definitions have changed over time. Abolitionists ; Abraham Lincoln ; Emancipation Proclamation ; March on Washington, 1963 ; Robert E. Lee ; Stephen Douglas African American--History ; African Americans--Social conditions. ; Civil rights demonstrations ; Confederate States of America--Biography ; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 --Views on race relations ; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865--Views on slavery ; National monuments ; Race discrimination. ; Racism ; Social movements ; United States--Race relations. 17 2944 White participants in the movement / Deciding loyalties I understand that there's sometimes considerable resentment in the movement... The group discusses a number of issues related to the group politics of the civil rights movement, specifically the issues of white people participating in or coordinating the movement, deciding which public figures to support, and the charges that African Americans are anti-Semitic. Anti-Semitism ; Integration ; Newspapers African American leadership ; African Americans--Conduct of life ; African Americans--Relations with Jews ; Civil rights demonstrations ; Civil rights movements--United States ; Civil rights workers ; United States--Race relations 17 interview Tougaloo College was and is a Black private liberal arts college in Tougaloo, Mississippi (near Jackson), founded in 1869. A small group of people, approximately four to six, one of whom is female, speak ; they are not identified in the recording of their interview. Warren discusses with the students the recent trial of Byron de la Beckwith for the murder of civil rights worker Medgar Evers. The trial resulted in a hung jury, with five voting to convict and seven opposed. They discuss whether the trial could have been rigged, and agree that even Mississippi's bothering to rig a mistrial would be a sign that things are changing--i.e., that the power structure knew national attention might make a simple acquittal disastrous. A female speaker expresses the opinion that if Beckwith is convicted in a later trial, he will not get the death penalty and will be pardoned after a short stay in prison. This speaker's skepticism about the motives of any white Mississippians leads Warren to probe the students on whether there can be an honest white Southerner and whether the African American's stereotype of himself has changed. (Note: Beckwith's second trial also ended in a mistrial, but he was convicted of Evers' murder in a third trial thirty years later, in 1994.) No transcript. All rights to the interviews, including but not restricted to legal title, copyrights and literary property rights, have been transferred to the University of Kentucky Libraries. audio Interviews may be reproduced with permission from Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, Special Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries. 0 http://www.nunncenter.net/ohms/render.php?cachefile=2003oh042_rpwcr031_tougaloo_ohm.xml 2003oh042_rpwcr031_tougaloo_ohm.xml https://oralhistory.uky.edu/catalog/xt7pvm42vb4w

Interview Keyword

Accommodationism
Mohandas Gandhi
Sit-ins
W.E.B. Dubois
Integration
Race identity
Africa
Southern mobs
Jackson (Miss.)
Nonviolence
Protest movements
Human rights
Passive resistance
Elections

Sort Priority

0021

Interview Usage

Interviews may be reproduced with permission from Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, Special Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries.

Files

moses3_sm.jpg


Citation

“Tougaloo Students,” The Robert Penn Warren Oral History Archive, accessed December 6, 2019, https://www.nunncenter.net/robertpennwarren/items/show/119.